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Mitch and the Edition(s) Feature (1968 - 1972?)

Photo Gallery - Band Lineups - Discography - Audio samples - Where Are They Now?

The Story

Mitch and the Edition (also sometimes referred to as the Editions) were one of the few beat groups that managed to make the transition from clubs to the ballrooms. Started in late 1968, the first mention we have found of the band is in Pat Egan's Beat column in the November 11, 1968 issue of Spotlight. He referred to the band as "First Edition" and felt they were poised to become one of Dublin's biggest beat groups. Over the next few months, the group continued to grow their reputation, and eventually became one of Pat's favourite bands on which he reported on a regular basis.

The original lineup was: Mitch Mahon (vocals), Leslie Mulvey (guitar), Eamonn Tierney (bass), Paul O'Hanlon (drums), Andy Dunne (keyboards), and Belfast man Paddy Frawley on sax. 1969 started with Pat Egan claiming the lads were one of the two best bands on the Dublin scene, but by May, in his column he warned, "First Edition must find a new opening (and fast). They are no longer a new group and more is expected now." Mitch had previously been the vocalist with the Fugitives.

As the year progressed, the band continued to gain in popularity ranking 6th in Pat's poll behind 1. The Vampires, 2. Skid Row, 3. Bye Laws, 4. Fire Brigade and 5. Deep Set.

As an interesting aside, in the June 14th issue of Spotlight, Pat reported that Dublin beat groups were pushing for higher fees for weekend gigs. The move was to set 22 as a minimum fee. It is no wonder groups started to lose members to the showband circuit as most of the top showbands were paying more than twice that much weekly to each musician in the band (and more). By August, Pat was touting First Edition as having "joined the big leagues" of the top groups on the scene in Dublin.  

In September, the boys went into the studio to record their first single (still rare for the times), You Got What I Need, which was written by keyboard player Andy Dunne. Released on November 1st, the record got decent airplay and further reinforced their reputation as one of the hottest groups on the club circuit. With the release of their single the band started to play of the ballroom circuit, leaving behind their beat group days.

The release of the single also brought about a change in name. It was reported that the single might be released internationally. Back in those days, there was already a big band called First Edition which featured future superstar Kenny Rogers. The change would be to Mitch and the Editions (throughout their history, their name was written both ways, with and without the "s"). It was also reported in Spotlight that the single was being released in the UK, but we cannot verify it this was ever the case. (In fact, Pat Egan asked in the November 28th issue of Spotlight why the British record press had not received copies of the group's single).

By the time the next popularity poll appeared in Pat's Beat column in November, "Mitch and the Editions" were ranked number two. The band was continuing to grow in stature and appeared on the RTE series, Like Now, in November as well. In December, Pye Records released a compilation album (on their Golden Guinea label) of Dublin beat groups called "Paddy is Dead and the Kids Know It" which featured two tracks by the Edition. As the year ended, the band had achieved just about everything possible for a Dublin group at the time without leaving the country (as most groups opted to go to London). They were playing all the major clubs and making good money (for a group as stated earlier).

Validation of the band's increasing popularity came in early 1970 when they were voted 4th best Irish Group behind Granny's Intentions, but ahead of Rory Gallagher's Taste. In February, they went into the studios and cut their second single, I Can't Stop. Photos in Spotlight as well as a comment in Pat Egan's column confirmed the recording session took place, however a few weeks later Pat reported the boys had decided against releasing the single. 

In May, 1970 there was plenty of speculation about the band's future, especially their next record. It was reported in The Evening Herald on May 2nd that the release would be Couldn't Live Without You with the flip side as I Can't Stop. In the summer of 1970, the band decided to take the big plunge into the ballroom circuit. Pat Egan wondered whether it was a good move on their part, asking "will they not now just become another band?" They signed with the Tom Costello organisation and were being managed by Arthur Walters.

As an interesting side note, groups that went "big" were always in a precarious situation. Before making the move, they were often considered the "big fish" in the small pond of Dublin's club scene, but afterwards, they were competing with the country's top entertainers with major publicity machines at work (and financial backing). At the same time, the free publicity they had been enjoying via Pat Egan's beat group column disappeared. Finally, playing to a stuffed club which held a few hundred people was much different than a ballroom which had comfortably held over 2,000 the week before for the Royal, or the Miami, or the Dixies.

For the rest of 1970, the band worked hard to establish themselves on the national ballroom circuit. Manager Arthur Walters spoke of the move in a 1971 Spotlight interview, "At first it looked a bit sad and we were inclined to fear the worst, but things have certainly changed." Slowly but surely, the group gained acceptance by more and more halls, but the bigger ballrooms still eluded them. "Said Arthur, "In the early stages most of the major halls didn't want to know us, but but the few that did were so happy with the band that word got around and soon everything was swinging for us."

In April, 1971, Pat Egan reported in his column that Mitch Mahon was set to leave the band and join the group Alyce. "It's something I have wanted to do for a long time" Pat reported Mitch had said to him earlier. However, this never happened as Mitch was still going strong with the band in June and beyond. Around this time, the band also had a change in their lineup as Eamonn Tierney left and was replaced on bass by Alan Murray. We think that former Creature, Liam McKenna may have spent some time with the group as we think he is picture below with the band when they played at the wedding of Chet Atkins' daughter. 

In May, 1971, the band finally released a second single, I'm Going Home, on the Polydor label which was again written by Andy Dunne. Once again the record received airplay on Radio Eireann, but did not make the charts. A few months later they released Hey Diana, also on Polydor and with the same result.

In early 1972 the band appeared on the legendary "Ken's Club" which was a radio show hosted by DJ Ken Stewart when bands came into the studio and recorded live tracks (as opposed to just playing their records), although most bands, including the Edition, simply played their most recent releases. In April, Mitch was involved in the recording of "Freedom Peace and Unity" which was written by the Swarbrigg Brothers, and released by the Times, but featured an all star cast including Derek Dean (Freshmen), Bobby Kelly (Sands) and many others. 

The last advert for the band Mitch and the Edition we can find was in November 1972, altho9ugh in October, there was an advert for their "Final Farewell Gig." On November 11th, 1972 there was an advert for Seezers (a night club on Abbey Street in Dublin) advertising "Mitch (ex-Editions) and his new Superband." At this point, we are not sure what happened to the band. We think they released another single, but we do not know the date or the label. We will continue to check our sources and if you know anything about their history after 1972, we invite you to send us an email and let us know.     

More to come.....

Photo Gallery

click on thumbnails for full image

First Edition - 1968 First Edition - 1969 First Edition - 1969 First Edition - 1969 First Edition - 1969
Editions - 1970 Mitch & the Edition (JB) Mitch & the Edition - '71 Mitch & the Edition - '71 Mitch & the Edition - '71

Mitch & the Edition - '72 Mitch & the Edition - '70 Mitch & the Edition - '71 Mitch & the Edition - '70 Mitch & the Edition - '71
Mitch & the Edition - '71 Mitch & the Edition - '70 Mitch & the Edition - '71 Edition (RF) Edition - 1969 (RF)
Edition - 1969 (RF) Edition - 1969 (RF) Edition (RF) Edition (RF) Edition (RF)
Edition (RF) Edition (RF) Edition (RF) Edition (RF) Mitch & the Edition - '71
   
Edition - 1970 Farewell Gig - 1972 Edition - 1971 Edition (RF) Mitch & the Edition - '71
Years Vocals Guitar Bass Drums Keyboards Sax
1969 Mitch
Mahon
Leslie
Mulvey
Eamonn
Tierney
Paul
O'Hanlon
Andy
Dunne
Paddy
Frawley
Oct
1970
Mitch
Mahon
Leslie
Mulvey
Liam
McKenna
Paul
O'Hanlon
Andy
Dunne
Paddy
Frawley
June
1971
Mitch
Mahon
Leslie
Mulvey
Alan
Murray
Paul
O'Hanlon
Andy
Dunne
Paddy
Frawley
             
             
             

Discography

You Got What I Need / I've Thrown Our Love Away
Pye Records - 7N.17844 - November, 1969
I'm Going Home / Couldn't Live Without You

Polydor Records - 2078-008 - June, 1971
Hey Diana / Lovin's Really Livin'
Polydor Records - 2078-105 - August, 1971
Gods' Children / What A Crazy Feeling
Unknown - Unknown - Unknown

Audio Clips

         
Coming Soon Coming Soon Coming Soon Coming Soon Coming Soon

Coming Soon

Where Are They Now?  

Andy Dunne - RIP: We heard recently from Andy's son that he passed away in 1986.
Mitch Mahon:
Leslie Mulvey:
Eamonn Tierney:
Paul O'Hanlon:
Band Member:

 


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In Loving Memory of Grant Gallagher: Sept. 21, 1990 - Nov. 18, 2006